Sunday, August 11, 2019

August/Sept. Window Box Gallery Installation : The DukkeoBeeKeepers

CarpOs Collective
The conversation of sustainability is as prevalent as always, but in the era of hype culture, is this conversation getting lost in the ever-changing- twenty-four-hour news cycle? Are we asking enough questions, or even the right questions? In a world where the system works against the cause and many world leaders turn a blind eye, how do we as individuals do more? 
    CarpOs Collective’s newest installation juxtaposes the idealized sustainable world against the harsh reality that is our industrialized world. Despite reality’s persistence to crash down on sustainability’s efforts, we are still hopeful. We are hopeful in the collective power of society to see the need for change. Our earth is desperate. We can succumb to the overpowering industries and suffer in a dying world, or we can persevere through the difficulties and change our collective habits. Our lifestyle choices and our consumer habits hold the most effective power against those sitting in their smog filled thrones.
The DukkeoBeeKeepers are those who will not let this conversation get lost in the infinite scrolls and the newest fads. We will continue the difficult conversations, and share knowledge, ideas, and resources. We strive to seek understanding, and lend an ear before lending a hand. We will breach reality with our idealism, and we will win.

CarpOs is an art collective initiated in 2017 by Shirls, Julia, and Joyce. Their relationship was born from a shared love for creating art and stories. They aim to create a healthy space for much-needed conversation among their diverse communities and celebrate the beautiful results of being open to differences and allowing these differences to work together.  

Wednesday, August 7, 2019

August Window Box Gallery - The DukkeoBeeKeepers


The conversation of sustainability is as prevalent as always, but in the era of hype culture, is this conversation getting lost in the ever-changing- twenty-four-hour news cycle? Are we asking enough questions, or even the right questions? In a world where the system works against the cause and many world leaders turn a blind eye, how do we as individuals do more? 
    CarpOs Collective’s newest installation juxtaposes the idealized sustainable world against the harsh reality that is our industrialized world. Despite reality’s persistence to crash down on sustainability’s efforts, we are still hopeful. We are hopeful in the collective power of society to see the need for change. Our earth is desperate. We can succumb to the overpowering industries and suffer in a dying world, or we can persevere through the difficulties and change our collective habits. Our lifestyle choices and our consumer habits hold the most effective power against those sitting in their smog filled thrones.
The DukkeoBeeKeepers are those who will not let this conversation get lost in the infinite scrolls and the newest fads. We will continue the difficult conversations, and share knowledge, ideas, and resources. We strive to seek understanding, and lend an ear before lending a hand. We will breach reality with our idealism, and we will win.

CarpOs Collective
CarpOs is an art collective initiated in 2017 by Shirls, Julia, and Joyce. Their relationship was born from a shared love for creating art and stories. They aim to create a healthy space for much-needed conversation among their diverse communities and celebrate the beautiful results of being open to differences and allowing these differences to work together.  

Sunday, June 30, 2019

July Installation in the Window Box Gallery - Mala by Sarah Katz


It is said that during the Neolithic age (10,000 BC), there was a 4000-6000 year period of relative peace and stability in matriarchal cultures across Europe, where several goddess figurines have been uncovered, indicating that the feminine was revered as divine. Entitled Mala after the artist's matriarch – her maternal grandmother – the piece shines a light on cultural context and expectations of life-birthing, aiming to mend the dissociation many of us have to the feminine. The felted sculpture is of a pregnant demi-Goddess mother figure, in front of a representation of the fallen woman. The mother figure tends to herself with one hand and holds her belly with the other. The artist wishes to shine a light on motherhood and life-giving, as we find ourselves in the throes of instability on psychological, communal, and political levels, and renewed politicization of women's bodies.


Sarah Katz is a published poet and fibre artist in the start-up phase of a wool-slipper social enterprise. After completing her studies in psychology and English literature, she has endeavoured to help add kindness and playful to the world. Her art touches on existential themes on the psyche, belonging and human worthiness, examining the value of body, heart, spirit in a capitalist context.

Friday, June 7, 2019

June Installation in Window Box Gallery


Window into Another World

Windows are a divider between one world and the next. One is instinctively drawn to its power and possibility. Is freedom just on the other side? Inside, the traveler makes her way to unknown places. This piece is inspired by Hokusai's landscapes and the paper doll cut outs from my mother’s old activity books. 

Erin McKluskey

Born in Ottawa, Erin is an emerging artist and illustrator working in Toronto. With a background in illustration and theatre, she creates images that exist on paper, walls, objects, spaces, and stages. Erin is interested in using imagery as an opportunity to explore the world, our environment and social issues.

Friday, May 3, 2019

May in the Window Box Gallery .....

BANKSIA SERRATA
by Sarah Dawn Richardson
Curated by Carpos Collective

Window Box Gallery
Gallery 1313
1313 Queen Street West, Toronto
Wed - Sun, 1 PM - 6 PM


I am a textile and bio-artist. I don't like the ordinary. I have a flair for the absurd, the gaudy, the surreal. I use fabrics,
beads, needlework, and the use of biological beings to create visualizations of a world outside of this
one. I believe art shouldn’t be confined to a visual experience. While my work is visually stimulating,
my work is also experienced through tactile stimulation. My work explores the traditional ideas of craft,
women's work, the hierarchy of biological beings, and the boundaries of fine arts in today’s artistic
establishment. BANKSIA SERRATA was inspired by an australian plant of the same name, as well
as fungi and molecular structures.  I use fabrics, beads, needlework, and the use of biological beings
to create visualizations of a world outside of this one. I believe art shouldn’t be confined to a visual
experience. While my work is visually stimulating, my work is also experienced through tactile
stimulation. My work explores the traditional ideas of craft, women's work, the hierarchy of biological
beings, and the boundaries of fine arts in today’s artistic establishment. BANKSIA SERRATA was
inspired by an Australian plant of the same name, as well as fungi and molecular structures.

Sarah Dawn Richardson is a 25 year old textile and bio artist. She was born in Hamilton, Ontario, and recently finished a bachelor's degree in Visual Arts and Art History from the University of Windsor. Richardson uses bold fabrics, beads, needlework, and living biological beings to create otherworldly sculptures.


SOCIAL MEDIA HANDLES:


Instagram: @braysl

Email: sarahdawnrichardson@gmail.com

Friday, April 5, 2019

Reading the Runes - Window Box Gallery

HELEN MCCUSKER
April 2019
Window Box Gallery, Gallery 1313, 1313 Queen Street West, 1-6PM Wed - Sun.
A graduate of Sheridan’s Illustration Program, Helen has been making art for more than 40 years. Her main focus is on Figurative work – creating Expressionistic drawings and paintings that speak to movement, energy and the deeply personal. Helen’s Figurative work always begins with drawing from live Artists’ models – looking for the elusive ‘something’ that carries the work beyond the skill of the drawing. It is mostly created in-session, using models with whom she has worked closely over many years. She sometimes brings in outside elements – found imagery, which is then incorporated into the work to create narrative. Helen also works with Paper Engineering as counter-point to her drawing and painting, creating Abstract Pop-Up sculptures incorporating hand-painted papers and collage. Helen is a member of the Etobicoke Art Group, Neilson, Park Creative Centre, and Visual Arts Mississauga. She works as an Art Instructor with Haliburton School of Art and Design, Visual Arts Mississauga and Neilson Park Creative Centre.

Curated by Carpos Collective


 Helen’s websites are: eaglewoodstudios.blogspot.ca theartfulpopup.blogspot.ca
Her work can also be seen on Facebook at Helen McCusker Artist and on Instagram@helen.mccusker

Friday, March 29, 2019

OCADU Gleaners circa 2019


Artist: Ines Scepanovic
Exhibit runs: April 3 - June 28, 2019
CWSE Hallway Gallery, 2nd Floor OISE 
252 Bloor Street West, Toronto

This site-specific installation uses imagery from Francois Millet's 1857 painting, The Gleaners, which depicts three impoverished farm workers collecting grain left behind after the harvest. The scale of Millet's original painting was 84cm X 112cm, a monumental size that was unprecedented in its depiction of themes of labour and poverty. The work was met with negative criticism and suspicion by the upper classes who saw this work as a glorification of the working class.

Originally located by the Sessional Faculty office at OCADU, this installation repeats, in varying sizes, multiple drawings of these three figures from The Gleaners. The figures are representative of the 77 sessional instructors currently employed at the Faculty of Art. As is the case with most Canadian universities, sessional faculty are precariously employed at OCADU. The university prides itself on hiring practicing artists, and yet arguably fails to foster an employment environment that encourages their art practices to flourish.

Ines Scepanovic has always been compelled to use visual language to express and challenge important ideas. Before entering the BFA program at OCADU, Ines’ focus often lay elsewhere. But, she has always made it a priority to carve out a space for her art practice. As an undergraduate and graduate student in Political Science, and then as a law student and lawyer, Ines variously studied art at the Ottawa School of Art, at the Faculty of Continuing Education at McGill University, and at the Toronto School of Art. The head of a single-parent family, she is currently pursuing her BFA at OCAD University on a part-time basis.

Motivated by an egalitarian belief that art can enrich us all, the focus of Ines’ art practice has been to make work that engages viewers outside the gallery setting. Capitalizing on the magic that happens when one comes upon artwork in a non-traditional or unexpected place, Ines has staged temporary installations in Canada and abroad since 1998.